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What Is The Best Substitute For Butter?

Written by:

Obi Obadike

Obi Obadike

Celebrity Fitness & Nutrition Expert, CFT, SFN, M.S. Founder & CEO – Ethical Inc.
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What is the best substitute for butter? There are many substitutes such as ghee, coconut oil and olive oil.  Ghee is a type of butter that has no casein or lactose. And it is best to substitute it for foods that are baked high in temperature.

Olive oil can also be substituted for butter. If a recipe calls for 1 cup of butter, you can replace it with ¾ to 1 cup of olive oil. The main reasons that ghee, coconut oil and olive oil are some of the best substitutes for butter is that it has properties similar to butter.

What Is The Best Substitute For Butter? Photo Credit: iStock- hayatikayhan

Some of the best foods are the best butter substitutes such as:

  • Applesauce– This can be added to baked goods and it helps add extra flavor and taste.
  • Greek Yogurt– is good for helping to make baked goods creamy, soft, and tender. It also helps to add extra protein to your food or recipes.
  • Mashed Bananas can be added to any baked foods you are making. It provides great nutrients while decreasing calories and fat.
  • Nut butters can help add flavor to baked goods.

One of the biggest reasons why you would avoid butter because it is high in saturated fat. When you have a high consumption intake of saturated fat it can lead to an increased risk of heart disease. And it can lead to an increased levels of bad cholesterol levels which would be your bad LDL’s.

One of the best ways to reduce your calories is cutting back on butter. Why? Because butter is high in calories it can make it difficult to lose weight if you consume too much of it in food.

Also, not everybody can eat butter dietary wise because either they may be lactose intolerant, or they may have milk allergies. That is why it is important to see what the best alternative choices to butter are in case you may be allergic to butter.

“One of the biggest reasons why you would avoid butter because it is high in saturated fat. When you have a high consumption intake of saturated fat it can lead to an increased risk of heart disease.” Celebrity Fitness & Nutrition Expert Obi Obadike

Here are the Nutrition Facts of 1 Tablespoon of Butter:

  • Calories- 102
  • Water- 16%
  • Protein- 0.2 grams
  • Carbs- 0.01 grams
  • Sugar- 0.01 grams
  • Fiber- 0 grams
  • Fat- 11.52 grams
  • Saturated Fats- 7.29 grams
  • Monounsaturated Fats- 2.99 grams
  • Polyunsaturated Fats- 0.43 grams
  • Trans Fats- 0.47 grams

The Bottom Line is there are plenty of healthier substitutes to butter to choose from that are less in calories and saturated fat. And some of them are ghee, olive oil and coconut oil.

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References

  1. de Souza RJ, Mente A, Maroleanu A, Cozma AI, Ha V, Kishibe T, Uleryk E, Budylowski P, Schünemann H, Beyene J, Anand SS. Intake of saturated and trans unsaturated fatty acids and risk of all cause mortality, cardiovascular disease, and type 2 diabetes: systematic review and meta-analysis of observational studies. BMJ. 2015 Aug 11;351:h3978. doi: 10.1136/bmj.h3978. PMID: 26268692; PMCID: PMC4532752.
  2. Siri-Tarino PW, Sun Q, Hu FB, Krauss RM. Meta-analysis of prospective cohort studies evaluating the association of saturated fat with cardiovascular disease. Am J Clin Nutr. 2010 Mar;91(3):535-46. doi: 10.3945/ajcn.2009.27725. Epub 2010 Jan 13. PMID: 20071648; PMCID: PMC2824152.
  3. Schwab U, Lauritzen L, Tholstrup T, Haldorssoni T, Riserus U, Uusitupa M, Becker W. Effect of the amount and type of dietary fat on cardiometabolic risk factors and risk of developing type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular diseases, and cancer: a systematic review. Food Nutr Res. 2014 Jul 10;58. doi: 10.3402/fnr.v58.25145. PMID: 25045347; PMCID: PMC4095759.
  4. Rosqvist F, Smedman A, Lindmark-Månsson H, Paulsson M, Petrus P, Straniero S, Rudling M, Dahlman I, Risérus U. Potential role of milk fat globule membrane in modulating plasma lipoproteins, gene expression, and cholesterol metabolism in humans: a randomized study. Am J Clin Nutr. 2015 Jul;102(1):20-30. doi: 10.3945/ajcn.115.107045. Epub 2015 May 27. PMID: 26016870.
  5. Deng Y, Misselwitz B, Dai N, Fox M. Lactose Intolerance in Adults: Biological Mechanism and Dietary Management. Nutrients. 2015 Sep 18;7(9):8020-35. doi: 10.3390/nu7095380. PMID: 26393648; PMCID: PMC4586575.
  6. Kattan JD, Cocco RR, Järvinen KM. Milk and soy allergy. Pediatr Clin North Am. 2011 Apr;58(2):407-26, x. doi: 10.1016/j.pcl.2011.02.005. PMID: 21453810; PMCID: PMC3070118.

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