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How Much Weight Can You Gain In A Month?

Written by:

Obi Obadike

Obi Obadike

Celebrity Fitness & Nutrition Expert, CFT, SFN, M.S. Founder & CEO – Ethical Inc.
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How much weight can you gain in a month? The rate at which you gain weight depends on factors such as body type, calorie intake, age, hormonal levels, activity level, sex, etc.  There are two types of gains which is body fat gain or muscle growth. Most people who set out fitness goals for themselves would rather be increasing muscle mass than gain fat.

How much weight can you gain in a month? Photo credit: iStock-Pongtep Chithan

The number of calories you consume and the amount of resistance exercise you do will dictate the amount of muscle mass you can gain. If you take a slower approach to gaining muscle in terms of slowly increasing your calorie intake, then that is a better muscle gain approach. The fat gain in this slower process is minimal.

If you increase your calories rapidly while bulking up it can cause you to gain an unnecessary amount of fat. It is possible to gain up to 15 pounds in 6 months if you add an additional 500 calories daily to the number of calories you are consuming to maintain your body. This slower approach can help you gain muscle with little fat gain.

If you a follow a more aggressive approach in weight gain you will mostly likely gain fat as opposed to muscle. If you eat 1000 calories a day additional to what you are eating to maintain your weight you can gain 25 pounds in 6 months. But most of that weight will probably be fat. The slower approach to weight gain is the best approach to maintain muscle gains and minimal fat gain in the process.

One of the important keys in gaining weight is being in a calorie surplus. Another important tip is increasing your protein intake to about 1 gram of protein per pound to help increase muscle gain. A third tip is incorporating resistance training into your workout routine. And also creating a weight-training program routine that targets every major muscle group at least once a week.

Once you start eating a lot of food to increase your calories it may be difficult at times to do that every day. So, some good calorie dense liquid drinks to help with increasing your calories are:

  • Whole Milk
  • Chocolate Milk
  • Weight gain protein powders and drinks
  • Fruit smoothies

When focusing on eating protein foods you want to aim for 25 to 40 grams of protein per meal depending on your size. And then the rest of your calories should come from carbs and fats. Protein is key to building muscle but don’t overload your daily protein intake either.

“The rate at which you gain weight depends on factors such as body type, calorie intake, age, hormonal levels, activity level, sex, etc.” Celebrity Fitness & Nutrition Expert Obi Obadike

The Bottom Line is you can gain up to 15 lbs. in 6 months if you consume an additional 500 calories beyond your maintenance daily calories. And while incorporating strength training in your regular exercise routine. This is the slower approach to weight/muscle gain which is the best approach if your goal is to gain muscle and minimal fat.

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https://offer.ethicalinc.com/suppressant-offer/ ?utm_source=blog 

References

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  3. Quagliani D, Felt-Gunderson P. Closing America’s Fiber Intake Gap: Communication Strategies From a Food and Fiber Summit. Am J Lifestyle Med. 2016 Jul 7;11(1):80-85. doi: 10.1177/1559827615588079. PMID: 30202317; PMCID: PMC6124841.
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  6. Leaf A, Antonio J. The Effects of Overfeeding on Body Composition: The Role of Macronutrient Composition – A Narrative Review. Int J Exerc Sci. 2017 Dec 1;10(8):1275-1296. PMID: 29399253; PMCID: PMC5786199.
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