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When Should You Take Ashwagandha?

Written by:

Obi Obadike

Obi Obadike

Celebrity Fitness & Nutrition Expert, CFT, SFN, M.S. Founder & CEO – Ethical Inc.
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When should you take ashwagandha? You can take ashwagandha in the morning or night depending on your health and wellness goals. Ashwagandha is a plant based adaptogen that has been used for traditional medicine thousands of years ago.

Ashwagandha supplements has become increasingly very popular in the health and fitness industry because of its claims to reduce blood pressure, reduce anxiety, improve sleep, reduce stress, and improve immunity.

When should you take ashwagandha? Photo Credit: istock- marekuliasz

Ashwagandha has been shown frequently to help relieve stress. It has adaptogenic properties which is believed to help regulate the body’s natural stress response. It is available in supplement form such as capsule, tablet, powder, cream, oils, etc. When you take ashwagandha it can take days to weeks to start to feel the effects from it.

There was a study in 60 people where they took 300 mg of ashwagandha daily and it took 10 weeks for them to feel the effects of improved sleep quality.

When you do take it is best not to do it on an empty stomach as it can potentially cause you a mild upset stomach. It is better to take it after you have eaten breakfast, lunch, or a snack. Your stomach will absorb it better and it will minimize you having any mild stomach pain.

Taking ashwagandha as a supplement is safe for most people but if you take it in high doses it can lead to diarrhea, upset stomach or vomiting. And that is one of the bad side effects to ashwagandha powder.

If you are pregnant, taking antidepressant medications, breastfeeding, sedatives you should consult your health care provider before taking an ashwagandha supplement.

“Ashwagandha has been shown frequently to help relieve stress. It has adaptogenic properties which is believed to help regulate the body’s natural stress response.” Celebrity Fitness & Nutrition Expert Obi Obadike

The Bottom Line is ashwagandha has a popular adaptogen that helps to regulate the body’s natural stress response. It has a lot of positive health benefits and can be taken in capsule, tablet, pill, or oil supplement form.

You can take it in the morning or evening time as there is no special preferable or best time. It is best to take it after you’ve eaten a meal or snack as that will minimize you having a mild upset stomach.

If you have any interest in trying any of our Ethical Supplement  products to help you heighten your immune system or assist you with your fitness, weight loss or health goals. You can go to https://ethicalinc.com/product/appetite-suppressant/

References

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