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What Are The Benefits Of Apple Cider Vinegar?

Written by:

Obi Obadike

Obi Obadike

Celebrity Fitness & Nutrition Expert, CFT, SFN, M.S. Founder & CEO – Ethical Inc.
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What are the benefits of apple cider vinegar? Apple cider vinegar is a popular home remedy, which has been used for many centuries. So, it is not really a new healthy remedy. Apple cider vinegar has a lot of health properties as well as antioxidant effects.

There has been some research has shown that apple cider vinegar can reduce cholesterol, help with weight loss, and even reduce blood sugar levels.

What Are The Benefits Of Apple Cider Vinegar?

Apple cider vinegar contains minimal vitamins or minerals, but it does contain some potassium levels. How is apple cider vinegar made? It is made by fermenting sugar from apples and then turns that into acetic acid which is the main component in apple cider.

Studies Have Shown That Apple Cider Can:

  • Kill bacteria such as e coli that is in spoiled food. It also has a long history of being used as a disinfectant.
  • Can lower blood sugar levels and manage diabetes. There was a small study where it improved insulin sensitivity by 34% by consuming a high carbs meal.
  • There was also another study where it reduced blood sugar in 5 people by 31.4% after eating 50 grams of white bread. There was another small study in people who had diabetes where they took 2 tablespoons of apple cider vinegar before bedtime. They reduced their fasting blood sugar by 4%.
  • Another study suggests where a group of people took apple cider vinegar with a carb meal, and they ate 275 fewer calories and it led to them losing weight.

Apple cider vinegar is used at times for improving the vitality of your skin. It is used as a remedy for people who have dry skin and eczema.

How Much Should You Use it?

  • The common healthy dosage is 1 to 2 teaspoons or tablespoons per day mixed with water. Try to stick to that dosage and not over do it as too much of it can lead to tooth enamel erosion.

The Bottom Line: There are a lot of health benefits to apple cider vinegar. But just like anything don’t over do it as that can be unhealthy too.

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References

  1. Östman, E., Granfeldt, Y., Persson, L. et al. Vinegar supplementation lowers glucose and insulin responses and increases satiety after a bread meal in healthy subjects. Eur J Clin Nutr 59,983–988 (2005). https://doi.org/10.1038/sj.ejcn.1602197
  2. Johnston CS, Buller AJ. Vinegar and peanut products as complementary foods to reduce postprandial glycemia. J Am Diet Assoc. 2005 Dec;105(12):1939-42. doi: 10.1016/j.jada.2005.07.012. PMID: 16321601.
  3. Andrea M. White, Carol S. Johnston; Vinegar Ingestion at Bedtime Moderates Waking Glucose Concentrations in Adults With Well-Controlled Type 2 Diabetes. Diabetes Care 1 November 2007; 30 (11): 2814–2815. https://doi.org/10.2337/dc07-1062
  4. Brighenti F, Castellani G, Benini L, Casiraghi MC, Leopardi E, Crovetti R, Testolin G. Effect of neutralized and native vinegar on blood glucose and acetate responses to a mixed meal in healthy subjects. Eur J Clin Nutr. 1995 Apr;49(4):242-7. PMID: 7796781.
  5. Yagnik, D., Serafin, V., & J Shah, A. (2018). Antimicrobial activity of apple cider vinegar against Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus and Candida albicans; downregulating cytokine and microbial protein expression. Scientific reports8(1), 1732. https://doi.org/10.1038/s41598-017-18618-x
  6. Park SY, Kang S, Ha SD. Antimicrobial effects of vinegar against norovirus and Escherichia coli in the traditional Korean vinegared green laver (Enteromorpha intestinalis) salad during refrigerated storage. Int J Food Microbiol. 2016 Dec 5;238:208-214. doi: 10.1016/j.ijfoodmicro.2016.09.002. Epub 2016 Sep 5. PMID: 27665528.
  7. Entani E, Asai M, Tsujihata S, Tsukamoto Y, Ohta M. Antibacterial action of vinegar against food-borne pathogenic bacteria including Escherichia coli O157:H7. J Food Prot. 1998 Aug;61(8):953-9. doi: 10.4315/0362-028x-61.8.953. PMID: 9713753.

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