FREE SHIPPING ON ORDERS OVER $69.99

What Are The Foods That Cause Inflammation?

Written by:

Obi Obadike

Obi Obadike

Celebrity Fitness & Nutrition Expert, CFT, SFN, M.S. Founder & CEO – Ethical Inc.
Share on facebook
Share on twitter
Share on linkedin
Share on email

What are the foods that cause inflammation? One of the foods that can cause inflammation is added sugars. The two main added sugars are table sugars and high fructose syrup. One of the reasons why you want to reduce inflammation to the body is because it can increase the risk of chronic diseases such as diabetes, heart disease, obesity, etc.

There was a study in mice where they were fed high sucrose diets and it revealed that they developed breast cancer that spread to the lungs. And that was due to the inflammatory response to sugar.

What are the foods that cause inflammation? photo credit: iStock-ttsz

Another study showed that high fructose consumption in mice has been shown to increase inflammatory markers in mice and  humans. There was a clinical trial where people drank soda, diet soda, milk, and water. The group that drank regular soda their uric acid increased and the effect of this is an increase of inflammation and insulin resistance.

If you consume fructose from fruits that is considered a good thing. But if you consume fructose from added sugars now that is an unhealthy choice. Eating a lot of fructose has been linked to obesity, insulin resistance, diabetes, fatty liver disease, cancer, and chronic liver disease.

Foods That Are High In Added Sugar are:

  • Candy
  • Cookies
  • Soft Drinks
  • Doughnuts
  • Sweet Pastries

Artificial Trans Fats

If you consume a high amount of artificial trans fats that can lead to a lot of chronic inflammation in the body. Some foods that are high in trans fats are French fries, microwave popcorn, some margarines, pastries, cookies, and most processed foods. If you look at the back of any food ingredients label trans-fat is always labeled as partially hydrogenated oils.

Refined Carbohydrates

Research studies have shown that refined carbs can potentially drive inflammatory gut bacteria that can potentially increase your risk of inflammatory bowel disease and obesity. Refined carbohydrates are found in candies, cookies, sugary soft drinks. And all processed foods that contain added sugar or flour.

High Consumption of Alcohol

People who drink alcohol heavily can develop bacterial toxin problems which can lead to a leaky gut and lead to potential organ damage. To avoid alcohol related inflammation problems, you should minimize your alcohol intake to one two drinks per day for men and women.

“People who drink alcohol heavily can develop bacterial toxin problems which can lead to a leaky gut and lead to potential organ damage.” Celebrity Fitness & Nutrition Expert Obi Obadike

The Bottom Line is there are a lot of foods such as candies, cookies, pastries, soft drinks, doughnuts, etc. that can cause inflammation, and it is important to be mindful of what those foods are.

And it is important to minimize the consumption of those types of foods. Inflammation in the body increases the risk of many chronic diseases such as diabetes, heart disease and obesity.

If you have any interest in trying any of our Ethical Supplement products to help you heighten your immune system or assist you with your fitness, weight loss or health goals. You can go to

https://offer.ethicalinc.com/suppressant-offer/

References

  1. Bjarnason I, Peters TJ, Wise RJ. The leaky gut of alcoholism: possible route of entry for toxic compounds. Lancet. 1984 Jan 28;1(8370):179-82. doi: 10.1016/s0140-6736(84)92109-3. PMID: 6141332.
  2. Wang HJ, Zakhari S, Jung MK. Alcohol, inflammation, and gut-liver-brain interactions in tissue damage and disease development. World J Gastroenterol. 2010 Mar 21;16(11):1304-13. doi: 10.3748/wjg.v16.i11.1304. PMID: 20238396; PMCID: PMC2842521.
  3. Spreadbury I. Comparison with ancestral diets suggests dense acellular carbohydrates promote an inflammatory microbiota, and may be the primary dietary cause of leptin resistance and obesity. Diabetes Metab Syndr Obes. 2012;5:175-89. doi: 10.2147/DMSO.S33473. Epub 2012 Jul 6. PMID: 22826636; PMCID: PMC3402009.
  4. Dixon LJ, Kabi A, Nickerson KP, McDonald C. Combinatorial effects of diet and genetics on inflammatory bowel disease pathogenesis. Inflamm Bowel Dis. 2015 Apr;21(4):912-22. doi: 10.1097/MIB.0000000000000289. PMID: 25581832; PMCID: PMC4366276.
  5. Spreadbury I. Comparison with ancestral diets suggests dense acellular carbohydrates promote an inflammatory microbiota, and may be the primary dietary cause of leptin resistance and obesity. Diabetes Metab Syndr Obes. 2012;5:175-89. doi: 10.2147/DMSO.S33473. Epub 2012 Jul 6. PMID: 22826636; PMCID: PMC3402009.
  6. Buyken AE, Flood V, Empson M, Rochtchina E, Barclay AW, Brand-Miller J, Mitchell P. Carbohydrate nutrition and inflammatory disease mortality in older adults. Am J Clin Nutr. 2010 Sep;92(3):634-43. doi: 10.3945/ajcn.2010.29390. Epub 2010 Jun 23. PMID: 20573797.
  7. Dickinson S, Hancock DP, Petocz P, Ceriello A, Brand-Miller J. High-glycemic index carbohydrate increases nuclear factor-kappaB activation in mononuclear cells of young, lean healthy subjects. Am J Clin Nutr. 2008 May;87(5):1188-93. doi: 10.1093/ajcn/87.5.1188. PMID: 18469238.
  8. Baer DJ, Judd JT, Clevidence BA, Tracy RP. Dietary fatty acids affect plasma markers of inflammation in healthy men fed controlled diets: a randomized crossover study. Am J Clin Nutr. 2004 Jun;79(6):969-73. doi: 10.1093/ajcn/79.6.969. PMID: 15159225.
  9. Han SN, Leka LS, Lichtenstein AH, Ausman LM, Schaefer EJ, Meydani SN. Effect of hydrogenated and saturated, relative to polyunsaturated, fat on immune and inflammatory responses of adults with moderate hypercholesterolemia. J Lipid Res. 2002 Mar;43(3):445-52. PMID: 11893781.
  10. Schultz A, Barbosa-da-Silva S, Aguila MB, Mandarim-de-Lacerda CA. Differences and similarities in hepatic lipogenesis, gluconeogenesis and oxidative imbalance in mice fed diets rich in fructose or sucrose. Food Funct. 2015 May;6(5):1684-91. doi: 10.1039/c5fo00251f. PMID: 25905791.
  11. Hu Y, Costenbader KH, Gao X, Al-Daabil M, Sparks JA, Solomon DH, Hu FB, Karlson EW, Lu B. Sugar-sweetened soda consumption and risk of developing rheumatoid arthritis in women. Am J Clin Nutr. 2014 Sep;100(3):959-67. doi: 10.3945/ajcn.114.086918. Epub 2014 Jul 16. PMID: 25030783; PMCID: PMC4135503.
  12. Ma T, Liaset B, Hao Q, Petersen RK, Fjære E, Ngo HT, Lillefosse HH, Ringholm S, Sonne SB, Treebak JT, Pilegaard H, Frøyland L, Kristiansen K, Madsen L. Sucrose counteracts the anti-inflammatory effect of fish oil in adipose tissue and increases obesity development in mice. PLoS One. 2011;6(6):e21647. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0021647. Epub 2011 Jun 28. PMID: 21738749; PMCID: PMC3125273.
  13. Bruun JM, Maersk M, Belza A, Astrup A, Richelsen B. Consumption of sucrose-sweetened soft drinks increases plasma levels of uric acid in overweight and obese subjects: a 6-month randomised controlled trial. Eur J Clin Nutr. 2015 Aug;69(8):949-53. doi: 10.1038/ejcn.2015.95. Epub 2015 Jun 17. PMID: 26081486.
  14. Jiang Y, Pan Y, Rhea PR, Tan L, Gagea M, Cohen L, Fischer SM, Yang P. A Sucrose-Enriched Diet Promotes Tumorigenesis in Mammary Gland in Part through the 12-Lipoxygenase Pathway. Cancer Res. 2016 Jan 1;76(1):24-9. doi: 10.1158/0008-5472.CAN-14-3432. PMID: 26729790; PMCID: PMC4703949.
  15. Kolb H, Mandrup-Poulsen T. The global diabetes epidemic as a consequence of lifestyle-induced low-grade inflammation. Diabetologia. 2010 Jan;53(1):10-20. doi: 10.1007/s00125-009-1573-7. Epub 2009 Nov 5. PMID: 19890624.
  16. Pearson TA, Mensah GA, Alexander RW, Anderson JL, Cannon RO 3rd, Criqui M, Fadl YY, Fortmann SP, Hong Y, Myers GL, Rifai N, Smith SC Jr, Taubert K, Tracy RP, Vinicor F; Centers for Disease Control and Prevention; American Heart Association. Markers of inflammation and cardiovascular disease: application to clinical and public health practice: A statement for healthcare professionals from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the American Heart Association. Circulation. 2003 Jan 28;107(3):499-511. doi: 10.1161/01.cir.0000052939.59093.45. PMID: 12551878.
  17. Gregor MF, Hotamisligil GS. Inflammatory mechanisms in obesity. Annu Rev Immunol. 2011;29:415-45. doi: 10.1146/annurev-immunol-031210-101322. PMID: 21219177.

.

More great content you may like

More great content you may like

Before you finish your last lap...

Don’t miss any of our great newsletters.