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Why Do I Get Cold After I Eat?

Written by:

Obi Obadike

Obi Obadike

Celebrity Fitness & Nutrition Expert, CFT, SFN, M.S. Founder & CEO – Ethical Inc.
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Why do I get cold after I eat? There have been some studies that have shown that the type of diet can be potentially responsible for the type of chills you can have. Your calorie intake is an indicator of your energy production and body temperature. Research studies show that long term calorie restriction with good nutrition is associated with lower body temperature in both lean and overweight adults.

Why do I get cold after I eat? photo credit: iStock- Pheelings Media

Another study reveals the longer you restrict your calories the colder you will most likely feel. If you have low blood sugar levels it may make you more sensitive to feeling cold after eating. And if you are implementing intermittent fasting it can at times lower your blood sugar which can potentially make you feel cold.

If you have hypoglycemia which causes blood sugar this typically happens when you are in a fasted state.

Eating Spicy Foods

Eating spicy foods like jalapenos, cayenne or habaneros will make your mouth extremely hot and cause you to sweat. What sweating does is it cools your body and lowers your internal body temperature. If you experience sweating while eating any spicy food, it will give you a cooling sensation at the end of the meal.

Drinking Cold Beverages

Drinking a cold beverage or eating cold foods like ice cream will cool your body and make you feel colder. Studies have shown that your body temperature after eating a cold beverage or food goes back to normal temperature after 20 minutes. A study revealed that drinking a cold beverage caused a 28 degrees Celsius drop in body temperature after 5 minutes.

Anemia

Anemia is a condition when you don’t have enough healthy red blood cells. One of the symptoms of anemia is feeling cold and that is a result of a lack of oxygen throughout the body. People that have anemia typically feel cold and feel chills throughout their body often. Other symptoms are irregular heartbeat, fatigue, and shortness of breath, etc.

Diabetes

If you have diabetes and it is unmanaged it can cause circulation and kidney issues that can leave you feeling cold. Unmanaged diabetes can lead to nerve issues called diabetic neuropathy.

Idiopathic postprandial

One of the symptoms of Idiopathic postprandial is low blood sugar levels. When you have IPS one of the negative effects is body shakes and chills as well as dizziness and weakness after a meal. And these symptoms typically happen 2 to 5 hours after a meal.

“If you have low blood sugar levels it may make you more sensitive to feeling cold after eating.” Celebrity Fitness & Nutrition Expert Obi Obadike

The Bottom Line there are several things you can eat that can make you feel cold. It can be a cold beverage, cold food or maybe you have anemia or unmanaged diabetes that can make you feel cold too. So be mindful of what you eat and mindful of any untreated medical condition you may have.

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References

  1. Mongraw-Chaffin M, Beavers DP, McClain DA. Hypoglycemic symptoms in the absence of diabetes: Pilot evidence of clinical hypoglycemia in young women. J Clin Transl Endocrinol. 2019 Jul 24;18:100202. doi: 10.1016/j.jcte.2019.100202. Erratum in: J Clin Transl Endocrinol. 2020 Dec 17;23:100242. PMID: 31428564; PMCID: PMC6695274.
  2. InformedHealth.org [Internet]. Cologne, Germany: Institute for Quality and Efficiency in Health Care (IQWiG); 2006-. Hyperglycemia and hypoglycemia in type 2 diabetes. [Updated 2020 Oct 22]. Available from: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK279510/
  3. Lawler, H.M. (2019). Idiopathic Postprandial Syndrome. In: McDermott, M. (eds) Management of Patients with Pseudo-Endocrine Disorders. Springer, Cham. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-22720-3_8
  4. Russell JW, Zilliox LA. Diabetic neuropathies. Continuum (Minneap Minn). 2014 Oct;20(5 Peripheral Nervous System Disorders):1226-40. doi: 10.1212/01.CON.0000455884.29545.d2. PMID: 25299279; PMCID: PMC4208099.
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  6. Chaparro CM, Suchdev PS. Anemia epidemiology, pathophysiology, and etiology in low- and middle-income countries. Ann N Y Acad Sci. 2019 Aug;1450(1):15-31. doi: 10.1111/nyas.14092. Epub 2019 Apr 22. PMID: 31008520; PMCID: PMC6697587.
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  8. Newman BH, Martin CA. The effect of hot beverages, cold beverages, and chewing gum on oral temperature. Transfusion. 2001 Oct;41(10):1241-3. doi: 10.1046/j.1537-2995.2001.41101241.x. PMID: 11606822.
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  11. Soare A, Cangemi R, Omodei D, Holloszy JO, Fontana L. Long-term calorie restriction, but not endurance exercise, lowers core body temperature in humans. Aging (Albany NY). 2011 Apr;3(4):374-9. doi: 10.18632/aging.100280. PMID: 21483032; PMCID: PMC3117452.
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