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What Are The Benefits Of Intake of Vitamin E Capsules?

Written by:

Obi Obadike

Obi Obadike

Celebrity Fitness & Nutrition Expert, CFT, SFN, M.S. Founder & CEO – Ethical Inc.
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What are the benefits of intake of Vitamin E capsules? Studies have shown that Vitamin E can improve skin health, cognitive health, improve lung function and can potentially reduce heart disease risk factors. If you choose not to take Vitamin E in dietary supplements you can obtain it through food. Vitamin E can be obtained through foods such as nuts, seeds, vegetables, and some fortified products.

What are the benefits of intake of Vitamin E capsules? Photo Credit: iStock-LysenkoAlexander

Supplementing Vitamin E regularly can function as a strong antioxidant in the body. There was a 2021 study where women supplemented Vitamin C and Vitamin E daily for about 2 months. And the result was reduced markers of oxidative stress with women that had endometriosis. Endometriosis is when tissues can be found on the ovaries, fallopian tubes, or the intestines. And the symptoms are menstrual irregularities and pain.

Heart Disease Factors

Research studies have shown that Vitamin E supplements can help reduce the risk of heart disease. A 2019 review showed 18 studies that Vitamin E significantly reduced systolic blood pressure but not diastolic blood pressure. Studies showed that Vitamin E and Omega 3 supplements may reduce LDL and triglyceride levels with people with metabolic syndrome.

Dysmenorrhea

Research studies suggest Vitamin E supplements may reduce pain in women that have dysmenorrhea. A 2018 study in 100 women who had dysmenorrhea showed that when they took 200IU of Vitamin E daily it relieved menstrual pain more than the placebo group. A 2021 study revealed that women who supplemented Vitamin E and Vitamin C daily for 8 weeks helped reduced the severity of pelvic pain and dysmenorrhea in women that had endometriosis.

The Amount of Vitamin E You Should Take?

The amount of Vitamin E you should take according to the National Institutes of Health are:

0 to 6 months- 4mg

7 to 12 months- 5mg

1-3 years- 6mg

4-8 years- 7mg

9-13 years- 11 mg

Over 14 years- 15 mg

Are there risks of taking too much Vitamin E? If you take too much Vitamin E, it can cause internal bleeding. According to the National Institutes of Health 1000mg of Vitamin E is the upper tolerable limit. Anything more than that would be considered excessive and too much.

Here are some Vitamin E rich foods:

Almonds- 1 ounce- 45% of the DV

Sunflower Seeds- 1 ounce- 49% of the DV

Spinach- ½ cup- 13% of the DV

Broccoli- ½ cup of 8% of the DV

Kiwi- 1 Medium- 7% of the DV

Mango- ½ cup- 5% of the DV

Tomato- 1 Medium- 5% of the DV

Vitamin E can be obtained through foods such as nuts, seeds, fruits, and vegetables. You would only obtain Vitamin E through supplements if you don’t get enough it from food.

The Bottom Line is Vitamin E is a fat-soluble nutrient that contains powerful antioxidants that can help reduce the risk of some chronic diseases. Such as reducing the risk of heart disease, improving lung function, improving skin health, and reducing the pain from dysmenorrhea.

If you have any interest in trying any of our Ethical Supplement products to help you heighten your immune system or assist you with your fitness, weight loss or health goals. You can go to

https://offer.ethicalinc.com/suppressant-offer/

References

  1. Amini L, Chekini R, Nateghi MR, Haghani H, Jamialahmadi T, Sathyapalan T, Sahebkar A. The Effect of Combined Vitamin C and Vitamin E Supplementation on Oxidative Stress Markers in Women with Endometriosis: A Randomized, Triple-Blind Placebo-Controlled Clinical Trial. Pain Res Manag. 2021 May 26;2021:5529741. doi: 10.1155/2021/5529741. PMID: 34122682; PMCID: PMC8172324.
  2. Emami MR, Safabakhsh M, Alizadeh S, Asbaghi O, Khosroshahi MZ. Effect of vitamin E supplementation on blood pressure: a systematic review and meta-analysis. J Hum Hypertens. 2019 Jul;33(7):499-507. doi: 10.1038/s41371-019-0192-0. Epub 2019 Mar 7. PMID: 30846828.
  3. Asbaghi O, Choghakhori R, Abbasnezhad A. Effect of Omega-3 and vitamin E co-supplementation on serum lipids concentrations in overweight patients with metabolic disorders: A systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials. Diabetes Metab Syndr. 2019 Jul-Aug;13(4):2525-2531. doi: 10.1016/j.dsx.2019.07.001. Epub 2019 Jul 9. PMID: 31405672.
  4. Sadeghi N, Paknezhad F, Rashidi Nooshabadi M, Kavianpour M, Jafari Rad S, Khadem Haghighian H. Vitamin E and fish oil, separately or in combination, on treatment of primary dysmenorrhea: a double-blind, randomized clinical trial. Gynecol Endocrinol. 2018 Sep;34(9):804-808. doi: 10.1080/09513590.2018.1450377. Epub 2018 Mar 15. PMID: 29542390.
  5. Amini L, Chekini R, Nateghi MR, Haghani H, Jamialahmadi T, Sathyapalan T, Sahebkar A. The Effect of Combined Vitamin C and Vitamin E Supplementation on Oxidative Stress Markers in Women with Endometriosis: A Randomized, Triple-Blind Placebo-Controlled Clinical Trial. Pain Res Manag. 2021 May 26;2021:5529741. doi: 10.1155/2021/5529741. PMID: 34122682; PMCID: PMC8172324.
  6. National Institutes Of Health- https://ods.od.nih.gov/factsheets/VitaminE-HealthProfessional/
  7. Vivarelli F, Canistro D, Cirillo S, Papi A, Spisni E, Vornoli A, Croce CMD, Longo V, Franchi P, Filippi S, Lucarini M, Zanzi C, Rotondo F, Lorenzini A, Marchionni S, Paolini M. Co-carcinogenic effects of vitamin E in prostate. Sci Rep. 2019 Aug 12;9(1):11636. doi: 10.1038/s41598-019-48213-1. PMID: 31406187; PMCID: PMC6690912.

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