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What To Do For A Slow Metabolism?

Written by:

Obi Obadike

Obi Obadike

Celebrity Fitness & Nutrition Expert, CFT, SFN, M.S. Founder & CEO – Ethical Inc.
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What to do for a slow metabolism? Incorporating a high intensity workout whether it be cardiovascular or weight-training wise can help speed the rate of your metabolism after the workout. Mixing up your exercise routine with high Intensity interval training workout such as sprinting, jump roping, plyometrics, etc. These exercises can help you burn calories after the workout. The after-burn effect is called (EPOC)- which is called exercise post oxygen consumption.

The more lean muscle mass you have the faster your metabolism will be. So, maintaining your muscle mass through strength training is critical to being successful with maintaining a fast metabolism.  Lifting weights will speed up your metabolism and that is why you should never neglect resistance training whatsoever.

What to do for a slow metabolism? Photo credit: iStock- gustavofrazaop

Muscle is more metabolically active than fat. Building muscle will help you increase your metabolism and burn calories even while you are resting. This is very important tip to remember that the higher amount of muscle you have the higher the metabolism you will have.

Studies show that resistance training was more effective at reducing bodyfat percentage, total body fat mass and belly fat compared to a control group that didn’t do any of this.

Why Protein Is Important In Speeding Up Your Metabolism?

Eating protein with each meal and making sure you get enough protein in your diet is very important. Why? Because protein is the essential nutrients to building muscle. Remember if your protein intake is low it will result to muscle loss.  And muscle loss leads to a slower metabolism.

Thermic Effect Of Food

The thermic effect of food is caused by the extra calories required to digest, absorb, and process nutrients in your meal. Eating protein will cause the largest rise in the thermic effect of food (TEF). 20 to 30% of your protein will be expended through your metabolism through digestion because of (TEF).

But with carbs its 5 to 10% and fats it is 0 to 3%. The thermal effect is the amount of energy expended during the digestion of food through the heat production.

The protein foods that have the highest thermal effect are lean meats like chicken, fish, turkey, beef, nuts, eggs, low fat dairy, etc. By getting most of your foods through protein it fills you up while 20 to 30% of it is burned immediately.  And this is because of the high thermal effect of the digestion of protein food which helps tremendously when you are trying to lose weight or burn fat.

Sitting Down For Long Periods Of Time Doesn’t Help Your Metabolism

Sitting down too much can cause weight gain and it burns fewer calories. This sounds like a cliché, but this is very true which is that moving throughout the day is your best friend when it comes to your health. Sitting for long periods of time has been compared to the negative ill effects of smoking.

If you have a desk job that requires you to sit for long periods of time. Try getting up every 2 hours for a small, short walk break in the office. Or maybe try investing in a standing desk as that is better than just sitting at your desk.

Lack Of Sleep

Not getting enough sleep or sleep deprivation can cause negative effects on your metabolism. A lack of sleep has been linked to increased blood sugar levels and insulin resistance.  Both things have been linked to Type 2 diabetes. Also, a lack of sleep has also been linked to obesity.

Drinking water may not necessarily speed up your metabolism but it will make you eat less food especially if you drink up to 8 glasses of water per day and stay hydrated. Water is the healthier replacement over sugary drinks, soda, alcohol, etc. Why? Because it contains 0 calories, and it fills you up so fast where you won’t eat as much food.

“The more lean muscle mass you have the faster your metabolism will be. So, maintaining your muscle mass through strength training is critical to being successful with maintaining a fast metabolism.” Celebrity Fitness & Nutrition Expert Obi Obadike 

The Bottom Line is having a fast metabolism will help you manage your weight and lose weight. And there are so many things you can do to speed up your metabolism like resistance training, high intensity interval training workouts and consuming more protein foods in your diet.

If you have any interest in trying any of our Ethical Supplement  products to help you heighten your immune system or assist you with your fitness, weight loss or health goals. You can go to https://ethicalinc.com/product/appetite-suppressant/

References

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