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How To Balance Your Hormones?

Written by:

Obi Obadike

Obi Obadike

Celebrity Fitness & Nutrition Expert, CFT, SFN, M.S. Founder & CEO – Ethical Inc.
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How to balance your hormones? Your lifestyle habits like diet and exercise will always affect the balance of your hormones. Consuming an adequate amount of protein with each meal is important to help balance your hormones.

Getting an adequate amount of protein will help curb your appetite and food intake. Many health experts advise consuming a minimum of about 20 to 30 grams of protein each meal. Some of those protein foods can be either chicken, fish, salmon, beef, steak, tilapia, etc.

How to balance your hormones? Photo credit: iStock-Irina Shatilova

Physical exercise increases blood flow to the muscles and enhances the delivery of nutrients and hormone signals. As well it increases hormone receptor sensitivity. And the main benefit of exercise is it can reduce insulin sensitivity and insulin levels.

Weight gain is associated with hormonal imbalances which can lead to issues with insulin sensitivity and reproductive health. Research studies have showed that obesity is associated with lower levels of testosterone levels and a lack of ovulation for women. Research studies have shown that weight loss can also reverse this condition.

The best way to lose weight is through a rigorous diet and exercise program that puts you in a caloric deficit.

Positive Gut Health

Your gut contains more than 100 trillion friendly bacteria which produces metabolites that can positively or negatively affect your hormone health.  Your gut microbiome regulates your hormones both good and bad. A healthy gut can positively affect your hormones by reducing your appetite and lowering your insulin resistance.

Lower Your Sugar Intake

If you minimize your added sugar intake that can possibly be influential in optimizing your hormone levels. Reducing sugary fruit drinks or soda or any food that contains a high amount of sugar can be helpful to your hormone health.

Stress

Having high stress in your life can be harmful to your hormonal health. A high amount of chronic stress can elevate your cortisol hormone. And this hormone helps your body cope with hormonal stress.

Elevated cortisol levels due to high stress stimulates appetite and increases your intake of sugary and high fat foods. And the result is higher calorie consumption which can potentially over time lead to obesity.

Obtaining Quality Sleep

Research studies have shown that poor sleep is linked to hormone imbalances such as insulin, cortisol, leptin, ghrelin, HGH, etc. There was a small study in 14 healthy adults and they had 5 nights of sleep restriction and their insulin sensitivity decreased by 25%. If you want to maintain a positive hormonal balance then try to aim for at least 7 hours of sleep.

Eating Fiber Daily

Research studies have shown that eating fiber regularly will increase your insulin sensitivity and help stimulate the production of hormones which will signal your body that you are full. Some of those high fiber foods are fruits and vegetables like bananas, oranges, apples, broccoli, spinach, asparagus, etc.

The Bottom Line is your hormones can be balanced by improving your lifestyle diet and exercise habits.  If you improve your sleep, eat fiber daily, exercise regularly, maintain a moderate weight, lower sugar intake, this will help tremendously maintaining positive hormonal health.

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