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Are Corn Tortillas Gluten Free?

Written by:

Obi Obadike

Obi Obadike

Celebrity Fitness & Nutrition Expert, CFT, SFN, M.S. Founder & CEO – Ethical Inc.
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Are corn tortillas gluten free? Corn tortillas are gluten free, so it is a healthier option compared to flour tortillas which has gluten in it. Flour tortillas are made of wheat and that contains gluten. The people that need to avoid eating gluten foods are people that have celiac disease. Celiac disease is an autoimmune response to gluten that causes damage to your digestive system.

The best way to find out if any tortillas contain any gluten is to look at the product ingredients list. But if you buy corn tortillas you are 100% safe to know that it is 100% gluten free.

Are Corn Tortillas Gluten Free? Photo Credit: iStock-bhofack2

Corn tortillas has 100% corn which elicits whole grains. The reason the whole grains in corn tortillas is so important is it delivers fiber which promotes positive digestive and heart health. Corn Tortillas is considered a cereal grain.

When I give advice to clients about what to eat on their diet meals when it comes to tortillas, I always say go with corn tortillas over flour tortillas because that is always the healthier option.

“Most Americans don’t get enough dietary fiber in their diet. And fiber is important for promoting positive digestive and heart health. And one of the best ways to get your daily fiber is through corn tortillas which has about 3 grams of fiber per 1 large corn tortilla.” Celebrity Fitness & Nutrition Expert Obi Obadike

This is the nutrition content of Corn Tortillas vs Flour Tortillas, and the portion is 1 Large corn tortilla vs 1 Medium Flour Tortilla.

Corn Tortilla

Calories95.9

Carbs- 16.9 grams

Protein- 2.51 grams

Fat- 1.25 grams

Fiber- 2.77 grams

Calcium- 35.6 mg

Iron- 0.54 mg

Magnesium- 31.7 mg

Sodium- 19.8 mg

Flour Tortilla

Calories-138

Carbs- 22.2 grams

Protein- 3.69 grams

Fat- 3.6 grams

Fiber- 1.58 grams

Calcium- 65.7 mg

Iron- 1.63 mg

Magnesium- 9.9 mg

Sodium- 333 mg

Flour tortillas have more iron and calcium than corn tortillas. White flour tortillas also have twice as many calories and fat than corn tortillas. The extra calories and fat from flour tortillas puts you at a higher risk of cancers, diabetes, heart disease, etc.

There are two type of corn tortillas as there are white tortillas, yellow tortillas, and blue tortillas. The only real difference between corn and white tortillas is the color of the tortillas. But yellow tortillas does have more beta carotene than white tortillas.

Research has shown that the blue corn tortillas is the healthiest of them all. Most Americans don’t get enough dietary fiber in their diet. And fiber is important for promoting positive digestive and heart health. And one of the best ways to get your daily fiber is through corn tortillas which has about 3 grams of fiber per 1 large corn tortilla.

The Bottom Line is that corn tortillas are gluten free, and it is the healthier alternative option over flour tortillas. It has less calories, less fat and even less carbs. And it is high in fiber which helps to promote good digestive health.

If you have any interest in trying any of our Ethical Supplement products to help you heighten your immune system or assist you with your fitness, weight loss or health goals. You can go to https://ethicalinc.com/product/appetite-suppressant/

References

  1. Zhu L, Adedeji AA, Alavi S. Effect of Germination and Extrusion on Physicochemical Properties and Nutritional Qualities of Extrudates and Tortilla from Wheat. J Food Sci. 2017 Aug;82(8):1867-1875. doi: 10.1111/1750-3841.13797. Epub 2017 Jul 11. PMID: 28696546.
  2. Lewis D, Haridy J, Newnham ED. Testing for coeliac disease. Aust Prescr. 2017 Jun;40(3):105-108. doi: 10.18773/austprescr.2017.029. Epub 2017 Jun 1. PMID: 28798516; PMCID: PMC5478399.
  3. Biesiekierski JR. What is gluten? J Gastroenterol Hepatol. 2017 Mar;32 Suppl 1:78-81. doi: 10.1111/jgh.13703. PMID: 28244676.
  4. Aune D, Keum N, Giovannucci E, Fadnes LT, Boffetta P, Greenwood DC, Tonstad S, Vatten LJ, Riboli E, Norat T. Whole grain consumption and risk of cardiovascular disease, cancer, and all cause and cause specific mortality: systematic review and dose-response meta-analysis of prospective studies. BMJ. 2016 Jun 14;353:i2716. doi: 10.1136/bmj.i2716. PMID: 27301975; PMCID: PMC4908315.
  5. U.S. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE

FoodData Central (usda.gov)

6. Dreher ML. Whole Fruits and Fruit Fiber Emerging Health Effects. Nutrients. 2018 Nov 28;10(12):1833. doi: 10.3390/nu10121833. PMID: 30487459; PMCID: PMC6315720.

7. Quagliani D, Felt-Gunderson P. Closing America’s Fiber Intake Gap: Communication Strategies From a Food and Fiber Summit. Am J Lifestyle Med. 2016 Jul 7;11(1):80-85. doi: 10.1177/1559827615588079. PMID: 30202317; PMCID: PMC6124841.

8. de Baaij JH, Hoenderop JG, Bindels RJ. Magnesium in man: implications for health and disease. Physiol Rev. 2015 Jan;95(1):1-46. doi: 10.1152/physrev.00012.2014. PMID: 25540137.

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