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What Are The 5 Worst Foods For Arthritis And Joint Pain?

Written by:

Obi Obadike

Obi Obadike

Celebrity Fitness & Nutrition Expert, CFT, SFN, M.S. Founder & CEO – Ethical Inc.
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What are the 5 worst foods for arthritis and joint pain? Arthritis is a common inflammation joint issue that affects over 40% in men and over 47% in women. There are numerous amounts of foods that can affect people with arthritis and joint pain.

What are the 5 Worst Foods For Arthritis And Joint Pain?– Photo credit: iStock-PIKSEL

“Arthritis is a common inflammation joint issue that affects over 40% in men and over 47% in women.” Celebrity Fitness & Nutrition Expert Obi Obadike

1. Foods That Have Gluten

Gluten is foods that have wheat, barley, rye, etc. And most people that have celiac disease are advised not to consume gluten foods as it will give them tremendous inflammation. Celiac disease is a common autoimmune disease that many people have in our society. There have been some research studies that have linked gluten foods with arthritis symptoms.

2. Processed Foods

Processed foods like baked goods, breakfast cereals, fast foods and all those added sugars can increase inflammation, increase heart disease, and increase arthritis symptoms.

3. Processed Red Meats

Processed red meats is high in inflammation which can also heighten arthritis in your joints. There was a study done on over 25,000 people that showed consuming high red meat intake could be a cause for inflammatory arthritis. There was also a research study that has shown that incorporating plant-based diets can decrease arthritis symptoms and reduce inflammation.

4. Drinking Alcohol

There was a research study done on 278 people that excessive alcohol intake increased the spinal structure damage in that group. Also, there are some studies that have shown that a high consumption of alcohol increases the risk of osteoarthritis.

5. High Sugary Foods

High sugary foods are found in ice cream, cookies, candy, soda. Limiting these types of foods will improve your internal health but also studies have shown it will reduce arthritis symptoms. There was a study that was done on slightly over a 1,000 people with the ages between 20 to 30 years old.

The study found that the group that drank fruit sweetened drinks 5 times a week were 3 times more likely to have arthritis than those who didn’t consume any fruit sweetened drinks. There was also a larger study with over 200,000 women and it detailed those women who drank a regular intake of sweetened soda had an increase of arthritis.

The Bottom Line is that following a healthy diet will help with improving any type of arthritis or joint pain.

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References

  1. Hu Y, Costenbader KH, Gao X, Al-Daabil M, Sparks JA, Solomon DH, Hu FB, Karlson EW, Lu B. Sugar-sweetened soda consumption and risk of developing rheumatoid arthritis in women. Am J Clin Nutr. 2014 Sep;100(3):959-67. doi: 10.3945/ajcn.114.086918. Epub 2014 Jul 16. PMID: 25030783; PMCID: PMC4135503.
  2. DeChristopher, L. R., Uribarri, J., & Tucker, K. L. (2016). Intake of high-fructose corn syrup sweetened soft drinks, fruit drinks and apple juice is associated with prevalent arthritis in US adults, aged 20-30 years. Nutrition & diabetes6(3), e199. https://doi.org/10.1038/nutd.2016.7
  3. Tedeschi, S. K., Frits, M., Cui, J., Zhang, Z. Z., Mahmoud, T., Iannaccone, C., Lin, T. C., Yoshida, K., Weinblatt, M. E., Shadick, N. A., & Solomon, D. H. (2017). Diet and Rheumatoid Arthritis Symptoms: Survey Results From a Rheumatoid Arthritis Registry. Arthritis care & research69(12), 1920–1925. https://doi.org/10.1002/acr.23225
  4. Tedeschi, S. K., Frits, M., Cui, J., Zhang, Z. Z., Mahmoud, T., Iannaccone, C., Lin, T. C., Yoshida, K., Weinblatt, M. E., Shadick, N. A., & Solomon, D. H. (2017). Diet and Rheumatoid Arthritis Symptoms: Survey Results From a Rheumatoid Arthritis Registry. Arthritis care & research69(12), 1920–1925. https://doi.org/10.1002/acr.23225
  5. Pattison DJ, Symmons DP, Lunt M, Welch A, Luben R, Bingham SA, Khaw KT, Day NE, Silman AJ. Dietary risk factors for the development of inflammatory polyarthritis: evidence for a role of high level of red meat consumption. Arthritis Rheum. 2004 Dec;50(12):3804-12. doi: 10.1002/art.20731. PMID: 15593211.
  6. Alwarith, J., Kahleova, H., Rembert, E., Yonas, W., Dort, S., Calcagno, M., Burgess, N., Crosby, L., & Barnard, N. D. (2019). Nutrition Interventions in Rheumatoid Arthritis: The Potential Use of Plant-Based Diets. A Review. Frontiers in nutrition6, 141. https://doi.org/10.3389/fnut.2019.00141
  7. Badsha H. (2018). Role of Diet in Influencing Rheumatoid Arthritis Disease Activity. The open rheumatology journal12, 19–28. https://doi.org/10.2174/1874312901812010019
  8. Min, H. K., Lee, J., Ju, J. H., Park, S. H., & Kwok, S. K. (2019). Alcohol consumption as a predictor of the progression of spinal structural damage in axial spondyloarthritis: data from the Catholic Axial Spondyloarthritis COhort (CASCO). Arthritis research & therapy21(1), 187. https://doi.org/10.1186/s13075-019-1970-3
  9. de Punder, K., & Pruimboom, L. (2013). The dietary intake of wheat and other cereal grains and their role in inflammation. Nutrients5(3), 771–787. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu5030771

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